Anabolic protein vs whey protein

A recent study compared the effects of supplementing with either a combination whey and casein protein versus carbohydrate on several markers of muscle anabolism during strength training. 3 Untrained men participated in a 10-week resistance training program and either supplemented with 40 grams of carbohydrate or 40 grams of protein containing a mixture of whey and casein. Half of the supplements were consumed one hour before and then immediately after exercise on workout days. The results were overwhelmingly positive for the combination protein group. Despite similar background diets and identical training programs, supplementation with protein resulted in greater increases in several measures of muscle anabolism, including greater increases in lean muscle mass, thigh muscle mass, muscle strength, anabolic hormones and muscle specific proteins.

Strangely enough, whey protein isolate is the type of protein recommended for both bodybuilders and people who want to lose weight. Bodybuilders simply consume the powder along with their normal meals to provide extra protein that their bodies can use to create lean muscle mass. Because the isolate digests quickly, it goes to work to promote recovery within a few minutes after consumption. People who want to lose weight can also use whey protein isolate as a meal replacement once or twice per day. This way, they can cut calories and build lean muscle, which provides a significant metabolic boost and helps burn more fat.

One thing I have thought, and I’m not sure anyone else has, is… does less testosterone in the blood actually mean that our body is producing less, or that more of it is in the cells. A very high protein diet has been proven to positively impact body composition, even during overfeeding, and personally I have noticed it makes me feel better. Could it be that the high amount of protein causes the cells to increase their uptake of testosterone to drive the protein into the muscles increasing muscle mass and thus leaves less in the blood. Just a thought

My research has shown that most, if not all, forms of whey protein concentrate and isolate powders contain preservatives made up of, among other things, large amounts of heavy metals such as copper and nickel, on the order of upwards of 25% of the suggested daily allowances for such metals, per serving. This is often true regardless of representations made on product labels, as such label terms as “whey protein concentrate” rarely disclose breakdowns of what is contained within those concentrates. The ingestion of such heavy metals can be very troublesome over time for those with liver issues. Are there any whey protein powders on the market free of such heavy metals?

Anabolic protein vs whey protein

anabolic protein vs whey protein

My research has shown that most, if not all, forms of whey protein concentrate and isolate powders contain preservatives made up of, among other things, large amounts of heavy metals such as copper and nickel, on the order of upwards of 25% of the suggested daily allowances for such metals, per serving. This is often true regardless of representations made on product labels, as such label terms as “whey protein concentrate” rarely disclose breakdowns of what is contained within those concentrates. The ingestion of such heavy metals can be very troublesome over time for those with liver issues. Are there any whey protein powders on the market free of such heavy metals?

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