Keloid treatment steroid injections

Keloids were described by Egyptian surgeons around 1700 BCE, recorded in the Smith papyrus, regarding surgical techniques. [ citation needed ] Baron Jean-Louis Alibert (1768–1837) identified the keloid as an entity in 1806. [ citation needed ] He called them cancroïde , later changing the name to chéloïde to avoid confusion with cancer. The word is derived from the Greek χηλή , chele , meaning " hoof ", here in the sense of "crab pincers ", and the suffix -oid , meaning "like".

Intravenously administered glucocorticoids , such as prednisone , are the standard of care in acute GvHD [7] and chronic GVHD. [24] The use of these glucocorticoids is designed to suppress the T-cell-mediated immune onslaught on the host tissues; however, in high doses, this immune-suppression raises the risk of infections and cancer relapse. Therefore, it is desirable to taper off the post-transplant high-level steroid doses to lower levels, at which point the appearance of mild GVHD may be welcome, especially in HLA mis-matched patients, as it is typically associated with a graft-versus-tumor effect. [ citation needed ] . Cyclosporine and tacrolimus are inhibitors of calcineurin. Both substances are structurally different but have the same mechanism of action. Cyclosporin binds to the cytosolic protein Peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase A (known as cyclophilin), while tacrolimus binds to the cytosolic protein Peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase FKBP12. These complexes inhibit calcineurin, block dephosphorylation of the transcription factor NFAT of activated T-cells and its translocation into the nucleus. [25] Standard prophylaxis involves the use of cyclosporine for six months with methotrexate. Cyclosporin levels should be maintained above 200 ng/ml. [26] Other substances that have been studied for GvHD prophylaxis include, for example: sirolimus, pentostatin and alemtuzamab. [26]

Meshkinpour et al (2005) examined the safety and effectiveness of the ThermaCool TC radiofrequency system for treatment of hypertrophic and keloid scars and assessed treatment associated collagen changes.  Six subjects with hypertrophic and 4 with keloid scars were treated with the ThermaCool device: 1/3 of the scar received no treatment (control), 1/3 received one treatment and 1/3 received 2 treatments (4-week interval).  Scars were graded before and then 12 and 24 weeks after treatment on symptoms, pigmentation, vascularity, pliability, and height.  Biopsies were taken from 4 subjects with hypertrophic scars and evaluated with hematoxylin and eosin (H & E) staining, multi-photon microscopy, and pro-collagen I and III immunohistochemistry.  No adverse treatment effects occurred.  Clinical and H & E evaluation revealed no significant differences between control and treatment sites.  Differences in collagen morphology were detected in some subjects.  Increased collagen production (type III > type I) was observed, appeared to peak between 6 and 10 weeks post-treatment and had not returned to baseline even after 12 weeks.  The authors concluded that use of the thermage radiofrequency device on hypertrophic scars resulted in collagen fibril morphology and production changes.  ThermaCool alone did not achieve clinical hypertrophic scar or keloid improvement.  They noted that the collagen effects of this device should be studied further to optimize its therapeutic potential for all indications.

Skin graft or skin flap. Skin grafts or skin flaps are done after the scar tissue is removed. Skin grafts involve replacing or attaching skin to a part of the body that is missing skin. Skin grafts are performed by taking a piece of healthy skin from another area of the body (called the donor site) and attaching it to the needed area. Skin flaps are similar to skin grafts, where a part of the skin is taken from another area, but with the skin flaps, the skin that is retrieved has its own blood supply. The section of skin used includes the underlying blood vessels, fat, and muscles. Flaps may be used when the area that is missing the skin does not have a good supply of blood because of the location or because of damage to the vessels.

Keloid treatment steroid injections

keloid treatment steroid injections

Skin graft or skin flap. Skin grafts or skin flaps are done after the scar tissue is removed. Skin grafts involve replacing or attaching skin to a part of the body that is missing skin. Skin grafts are performed by taking a piece of healthy skin from another area of the body (called the donor site) and attaching it to the needed area. Skin flaps are similar to skin grafts, where a part of the skin is taken from another area, but with the skin flaps, the skin that is retrieved has its own blood supply. The section of skin used includes the underlying blood vessels, fat, and muscles. Flaps may be used when the area that is missing the skin does not have a good supply of blood because of the location or because of damage to the vessels.

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